Saturday, January 24, 2009

Any ideas?

Alright Geoblogosphere, I have a challenge for you: any idea what this is?! Only info I have for you is it is from central Tennessee (Ordovician).


Click on pictures for larger view

The only thought we have had so far is maybe(??) Cruziana???

Thanks for any help you can give!

© ReBecca K. Hunt-Foster

13 comments:

Neil said...

Hmm...a very strangely weathered/deformed orthoconic nautiloid like Endoceras? Total wild guess there.

ReBecca Foster said...

Hmmm....maybe. There is another thing from that area that I think is a nautiloid. Would/Could a nautiloid have that sort of "S"-ish shape to it though?

Raptor Lewis said...

Is this a riddle where you know answer? Well, either way, my guess is it looks like it's related to a trilobite from my first glance. Is it a nautiloid? Looked like an arthropod to me.

ReBecca Foster said...

I seriously do not know. That is why I am looking for help. Keep the ideas coming please!

Penny said...

It looks trilobitish to me. But I can see where one might think it's a cephalopod. Trilobite was my first instinct - a body fossil though, not a trace fossil like Cruziana. My guess is that the most clear 'end' of it is the tail of a large trilobite, and that the head is missing. The s-shaped bits could be leg parts or gills?

ReBecca Foster said...

That is exactly what I though on first look Penny - trilobite. John did not think so :/

Bill Parker said...

I was going to say trilobite body fossil as well but others beat me to it; so I will go out on a limb and say early vertebrate ("fish"), as it is segmented. Looks like a dorsal view with backbone extending posteriorly.

Raptor Lewis said...

How old is it, first of all? Y'know, if this is a "new" organism, than I'll be a T-rex.

Neil said...

"Trilobite" was my first thought too, but I managed to convince myself that there were too many segments. I tend to think of trilobites having ~20 thoracic segments or less but I suppose there are some exceptions. Nautiloid sutures can be a little wavy but I'll admit the geometry doesn't seem quite right which was why I invoked deformation/weathering. Not feeling very confident about that though.

ReBecca Foster said...

A friend of mine asked his invert prof. (one that works int he Paleozoic) what it might be and he thinks it is a nautiloid cephalopod irregularly sectioned, similar to Gonioceras occidentale.

Travis Lamar Atwood said...

My guess: Cruziana trilobite feeding path.
http://www.trilobites.info/triloichno.jpg
http://english.fossiel.net/system/glossarium/trilobietspoor.jpg
http://www.edu.xunta.es/contidos/sec/bioloxia/biosfera/alumno/4ESO/terra_cambia/imaxes/cruziana.jpg

ReBecca Foster said...

That is what I thought too Travis. But the more people we show it too the more we hear Gonioceras.

Glad to have you back int he blogging world. How is the thesis coming? Have a defense date yet?

Maddie said...

Is It That Scorpian I Heard About?
Other wise it looks like a fish