Tuesday, September 30, 2008

Mygatt-Moore Quarry Photos

These past few weeks we have been spending quite a bit of time working out in the Late Jurassic Mygatt-Moore Quarry. This quarry is located in the middle Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation, in western Colorado. The most abundant dinosaur taxon at the quarry is the theropod Allosaurus (29%), which is represented by 6 individuals (5 adults, 1 juvenile); in addition, more than 190 mostly shed teeth of Allosaurus have been recovered from the site. The sauropod Apatosaurus is next most abundant (20%) with 5 individuals known from this site (3 adults, 1 sub-adult, 1 juvenile). Approximately 19% of the sample consists of bones of the ankylosaur Mymoorapelta, mostly osteoderms and lateral spines (2 individuals). The three most abundant sauropods in the Morrison Formation (Camarasaurus, Apatosaurus, and Diplodocus) also are preserved at the Mygatt-Moore Quarry, but unlike within the formation as a whole, at the MMQ Apatosaurus accounts for 85% of the sauropod bones at the site; in the formation overall, Camarasaurus is the most abundant sauropod.

I had the privilege of working at the Mygatt-Moore Quarry in 2007 as the Field Coordinator for the Museum of Western Colorado's Dinosaur Journey Museum in Fruita, Colorado. This week I have finally had a chance to load some of my pictures fron this season and last season. The majority of these pictures are from the summer of 2007 when we removed a sauropod tibia and several vertebrae (among many other things!). Some of the pictures towards the end of the section are from the end of the 2008 field season as we removed a sauropod vertebra (actually we removed two but we only have photos of one of the efforts) and prepare to remove a sauropod scapulocoracoid.

Enjoy the pictures!

5 comments:

Silver Fox said...

Those are neat photos, showing the dig and all the methods from beginning to end! Is that part of the Morrison Formation bluish gray or gray from carbonaceous and organic material?

Doug said...

Awesome pictures, ReBecca! You're so lucky to be working on such a project! I envy you.

Lovelace said...

Fieldwork late in the season... always the best! Cool, quiet, Love the pics. Sounds like a good field season all in all! Can't wait to see you in a coupla' weeks! Hey, I have a new blog up too... it's more rocks than bones but...
Peace!

ReBecca Foster said...

Thanks everyone :)
I have some more that I hope to get posted sometime.

I did see your blog Dave. I just could not figure out how to post a comment there yet ;)

dome sweet dome said...

Cool - no doubt I'll be asking for hi-res copies for the newsletter, ads... Have John pick a few for the 2009 Dino Digs brochure!